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Baby's Care and Development
Check-ups and shots (immunizations)

Catch-Up Immunization scheduler. Learn what vaccines your child has missed according to the CDC vaccination schedule.

Check-ups

An important part of keeping your baby healthy is taking him to a pediatrician for "well baby" check-ups. At each visit the doctor will weigh and measure your baby to make sure he is growing at a healthy rate, check his eyesight and hearing, and talk to you about his behavior. These visits also give you a chance to ask any questions you might have about your baby's development.

A doctor should see your baby when your baby is:

  • Within the first month
  • Two months old
  • Four months old
  • Six months old
  • Nine or fifteen months old
  • 12 months old

Shots (Immunizations)

Your baby will need the following shots during the first 15 months of life:

  • Hep B: Protects against hepatitis B, a serious liver disease
  • DTaP: Protects against diphtheria, tetanus (lockjaw), and pertussis (whooping cough)
  • Hib: Protects against haemophilus influenza type b
  • Polio: Protects against polio. This vaccine is given as a shot (inactivated vaccine called IPV).
  • MMR: Protects against measles, mumps, and rubella (German measles)
  • Chickenpox: Varicella zoster vaccine protects against chickenpox

Use the chart as a guide for when your baby should get his shots. Shots can usually be given even if your baby has a cold or is sick on the day of the visit. Your doctor will determine a specific schedule for your child.

Your child may be eligible for his or her vaccines at a reduced rate. Please review The N.C. Division of Public Health's Vaccines for Children Program fact sheet for additional information.

Age

Shots needed

Birth to two months

Hep B

1 to 4 months

Hep B

2 months

DTaP, Hib, Polio

4 months

DTaP, Hib, Polio

6 months

DTaP, Hib, Hep B

12 months

MMR, Hib, Polio, Chickenpox

15 months

DTaP

All babies should be immunized. Immunizations are required to attend child care and school. If you don't have a pediatrician, call your local health department. They usually give shots to children (at no or low cost) or can help you find a clinic that provides shots.

Other Links

North Carolina

Opens in new window Vaccines for Children Program The N.C. Division of Public Health's fact sheet explains eligibility for this program and other information pertaining to reduced costs for required vaccines for children up to 19 years of age.

Opens in new window Period of PURPLE Crying Program web site designed to help parents understand this time in their baby’s life, which is a normal part of every infant’s development.

Opens in new window WIC Program Breastfeeding and Support WIC strives to increase the incidence and duration of breastfeeding among women enrolled in the Program.

Carolinas Poison Center - 1-800-222-1222

National

HEALTHYCHILDREN.ORG a new parenting Web site from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP).  The site includes general information related to child health plus more specific guidance on parenting issues and is promoted as "the only parenting Web site backed by 60,000 pediatricians committed to the attainment of optimal physical, mental and social health and well-being for all infants, children, adolescents and young adults." 

For more health information, search MedlinePlus

MedlinePlus Trusted Health Information for You

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Last updated: May 2014

 
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